Home>Congress>Ex-Trump aide who said ‘semen-exposed’ women have better cognitive skills raises $100k for congressional bid
New Jersey Republican congressional candidate Robert Patterson was an acting associate commissioner of the U.S. Social Security Administration under President Donald Trump.
New Jersey Republican congressional candidate Robert Patterson was an acting associate commissioner of the U.S. Social Security Administration under President Donald Trump.

Ex-Trump aide who said ‘semen-exposed’ women have better cognitive skills raises $100k for congressional bid

Robert Patterson challenging Van Drew in NJ-2

By David Wildstein, October 15 2019 2:49 pm

A controversial former Trump administration official who has argued that condoms deprive women of the “remarkable” chemicals found in semen has raised $100,342 for his bid to challenge Rep. Jeff Van Drew (D-Dennis) in New Jersey’s 2nd district.

Robert Patterson, who served as a senior advisor and acting associate commissioner of the U.S. Social Security Administration under Trump, has said that semen helps elevate mood and self-esteem and argued that “semen-exposed” women have better concentration and cognitive skills.

Patterson is one of three Republicans seeking to challenge Van Drew, who flipped a House seat last year that the GOP had held since 1995.  He faces former Atlantic County Young Republican Chairman Brian Fitzherbert and ex-Hill International CEO David Richter.

According to a report filed with the Federal Election Commission, Patterson has spent $23,798 and has $76,543 cash-on-hand.  He has loaned $12,950 to his campaign.

The former Breitbart News staffer has a contentious past.

Patterson was forced to resign his post in the administration of Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett in 2012 after the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that he was simultaneously working as an editor of The Family in America, which advocates for the “natural human family.”

Birth control, Patterson said, weakens a women’s “natural sense of attraction to men who would be a good biological match and enable her to conceive easily and bear healthy children.”

He also suggested that working mothers is a government-created problem that hurts marriages and “the well-being of children.”

“Congress incentivized family breakup by creating a child-support system that virtually guarantees divorcing mothers and their children an income stream without requiring those women, who initiate two-thirds of marital disruptions, to demonstrate any wrongdoing on the part of the father,” Patterson said.  “All this needs to go.”

He said that health officials could combat childhood obesity by finding ways to get mothers back into the home.

Patterson maintains that by offering advantages to young women, “affirmative action has disrupted the marriage market and helped lead to dramatic increases in cohabitation and single households.”

In the past, Patterson has also worked for the Family Research Council and the International Organization for the Family, both fervent opponents of gay rights.

“Gay marriage, like all the liberal ideas of the 1970s–including no-fault divorce, abortion on demand, cohabitation, and daycare–does not and cannot serve the common good,” Patterson said in a 2004 op-ed for Human Events Online.

Patterson slammed the American Psychiatric Association for removing homosexuality from a list of mental disorders and wrote that sexual orientation can be forcibly changed.

“Because it predates society and the state, wedlock actually creates, builds, and renews society. Same-sex marriage — a construct that depends on the state for its very existence — can never duplicate these functions,” Patterson wrote in 2009.  “Of course, insisting that marriage law should reflect what nature, history, and reason affirm risks offending not so much homosexuals as cultural elites who care little about America.”

After being pushed out of his $104,000-a-year job in Pennsylvania, the Corbett administration distanced itself from Patterson’s comments.

Patterson was the vice president for government relations at the U.S Business & Industry Council and worked in President George W. Bush’s administration as a speechwriter.

He is making his second bid for Congress.  He won 37% of the vote in the 1st district against Rep. Donald Norcross (D-Camden) in 2016.

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