Home>Highlight>After murder of federal judge’s son, Assembly passes bill to protect privacy of judges, prosecutors, law enforcement

U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas. (Photo: YouTube.)

After murder of federal judge’s son, Assembly passes bill to protect privacy of judges, prosecutors, law enforcement

Bill named after Daniel Salas, 20-year-old son of judge, who was murdered in his home on July 19

By David Wildstein, September 24 2020 12:05 pm

Legislation prohibiting the posting of home addresses and phone numbers of judges and prosecutors online spurred by the murder of U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas’ son was approved by the State Assembly today.

The bill was named “Daniel’s Law” in tribute to the judge’s 20-year-old son, Daniel.

“Making tough decisions is part of the job for judges and prosecutors. Sometimes these decisions aren’t popular, and they become a target. It’s frightening to think that disgruntled individuals may be able to find their home addresses and personal phone numbers readily available at the touch of a button.

“Our hearts continue to break for Judge Salas and her family. The goal of this bill is to better protect the privacy of judges and prosecutors by prohibiting their personal addresses and contact information from being shared online without their consent.”

Roy Den Hollander, an anti-feminist lawyer who had a case assigned to Salas, shot and killed the judge’s son on July 19.

Mark Anderl, the judge’s husband, was also critically wounded in the attack on their home.  He was shot in the chest and arm and is still recovering from injuries that led to multiple surgeries.

The proposal would apply to current and former judicial officers and federal, state, county and municipal prosecutors, and amends the existing law to prohibit the disclosure of addresses for law enforcement officers.

The bill is sponsored in the Assembly by Speaker Craig Coughlin, Annette Quijano (D-Elizabeth), Yvonne Lopez (D-Perth Amboy), and Ralph Caputo (D-Nutley).

“Making tough decisions is part of the job for judges and prosecutors. Sometimes these decisions aren’t popular, and they become a target,” the sponsors said in a statement.  “It’s frightening to think that disgruntled individuals may be able to find their home addresses and personal phone numbers readily available at the touch of a button.”

Salas has urged a “national dialogue” to safeguard the privacy of federal judges.

“Let me be clear and tell you firsthand—this is a matter of life and death. And we can’t just sit back and wait for another tragedy to strike,” she said in a video released last month.

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