Home>Press Release>MacArthur joins bipartisan effort urging Congress to increase funding for Alzheimer’s

MacArthur joins bipartisan effort urging Congress to increase funding for Alzheimer’s

By NJG Press Releases, March 16 2018 1:59 pm

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressman Tom MacArthur announced he has joined a group of bipartisan lawmakers who are urging Congress to increase funding for Alzheimer’s research at the National Institutes of Health by $425 million.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), five million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease in the year 2013.  This number is expected to almost triple to 14 million by the year 2050.

 

“My Dad died just last week after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s,” said Congressman Tom MacArthur.  “He was a good man who proudly served our nation during the Korean War and always had a strong sense of duty. He was optimistic, full of good humor and remained resilient during some difficult times.  Then I watched him slip away week after week, year after year.  I feel the pain of those who watch their loved ones suffer from Alzheimer’s, which still has no known means of prevention or effective treatment.  Researching the causes of and treatments for Alzheimer’s has the potential to save millions of people from the darkness and heartache of this terrible disease.  I’m grateful members from both parties were able to come together and advocate for this critical funding.”

 

 

Full Text of the letter:

 

The Honorable Tom Cole

Chairman

Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human

Services and Education Appropriations

Washington, DC  20515

 

The Honorable Rosa DeLauro

Ranking Member

Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human

Services and Education Appropriations

Washington, DC  20515

 

 

Dear Chairman Cole and Ranking Member DeLauro:

 

            We thank you for your leadership in supporting Alzheimer’s research and for your continued efforts to ensure that a $414 million increase in funding for Alzheimer’s research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is finalized in fiscal year 2018.  We write to request a $425 million increase in funding for Alzheimer’s research at NIH in FY 2019, as compared to the level included in the FY 2018 Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill. 

 

            Alzheimer’s is a tragic disease affecting millions of Americans, and it has reached crisis proportions.  There is no effective treatment, no means of prevention, and no method for slowing the progression of the disease.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), five million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease in the year 2013.  This number is expected to almost triple to 14 million by the year 2050. 

 

            Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States.  In 2017, the direct cost of care for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias was estimated to be $259 billion, with 67 percent of those costs paid for by Medicare or Medicaid. Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias will increase exponentially as the baby boom generation ages. At the current rate, the cost of Alzheimer’s will reach $1.1 trillion dollars in 2050.

 

            Our nation is at a crossroads.  We must act now to change the trajectory of this disease.  The National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease calls for a cure or an effective treatment for Alzheimer’s by the year 2025.  Reaching this goal will require a significant increase in federal funding for Alzheimer’s research. 

 

            We therefore urge you to provide a $425 million increase in funding for Alzheimer’s research for a total appropriation of $2.23 billion in FY 2019 for Alzheimer’s Disease including Alzheimer’s Disease Related Dementias (AD/ADRD).  We thank you for your attention to our concerns, and we look forward to working with you to invest in research that will lead to a cure for this devastating disease.

 

 

Camille M. Gallo

Communications Director

Congressman Tom MacArthur (NJ-3)

Phone: (202) 225-4765

 

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